Select Page
Podcast 244:  How to Experience True Revival

Podcast 244: How to Experience True Revival

We talk much about revival in Christian circles.  In fact, often we schedule an evangelist to come to our church and preach salvation messages for an entire week and call it a “revival.”  But what does revival mean?  What are we trying to experience?  What are we trying to revive?

The Webster definition of revival is:  to restore life or strength, to give new strength or energy.  It also means the growth of something or an increase in the activity of something after a long period of no growth or activity.

So, for the Christian, a revival happens when we have our strength in the Lord restored or have new strength or energy given to us by the Holy Spirit.  Or, it means when we experience an increase in something that we have long let die.  Sound familiar?

Are you in need of revival but don’t know how to go about getting revived?  Then keep listening.

Download this episode (right click and save)

big_lines

            podcast-25-25

Podcast 243:  The Exchanged Life

Podcast 243: The Exchanged Life

In Zechariah 7 we find the Lord stripping away the face paint of religion and forcing His children to look deeply at their attitudes and motives, and not their religious actions and practices.  Here He says to them, and to us:

“When you fasted and mourned in the fifth and seventh months during those seventy years, did you really fast for Me— for Me?” (Zech. 7:5-6).

His words cut deep because they are convicting and they are true.  They also reveal how far we, as the church of today, have fallen from the standard set by the Acts church, the template, the prototype of how church should be.  Consider the difference between life in the book of Acts and the life of the church today.

Then, they were focused on power.  Now, we are focused on correct doctrine and seminary degrees.
Then, the abundant life.  Now, cutting edge entertainment.
Then, sacrifice and commitment.  Now, potluck suppers and youth trips to Disneyworld.
Then, confrontation.  Now, tolerance.
Then, boldness.  Now, we just want to fit in.
Then, holiness.  Now, compromise.
Then, one accord, unity.  Now, fragmentation and denominationalism.
Then, baptized and full of the Holy Spirit.  Now, we debate those very terms.

There has to be something more to the Christian life than what we are experiencing.

Oh, there’s more.  Much more.  Keep listening to find out what is missing.

The following is a study on Zechariah 7:1-14.

Download this episode (right click and save)

big_lines

            podcast-25-25

The Witness of the Spirit

The Witness of the Spirit

We are in danger of getting the barter spirit when we come to God, we want the witness before we have done what God tells us to do.  “Why does not God reveal Himself to me?”  He cannot; it is not that He will not, but He cannot, because you are in the road as long as you won’t abandon absolutely to Him.  Immediately you do, God witnesses to Himself; He cannot witness to you, but He witnesses instantly to His own nature in you.  If you had the witness before the reality, it would end in sentimental emotion.  Immediately you transact on the Redemption and stop the impertinence of debate, God gives you the witness.  As soon as you abandon reasoning and argument, God witnesses to what He has done, and you are amazed at your impertinence in having kept Him waiting.  If you are in debate as to whether God can deliver from sin, either let Him do it, or tell Him He cannot.  Do not quote this and that person, try Matthew 11:28, “Come unto Me.”  Come, if you are weary and heavy laden; ask if you know you are evil (Luke 11:13).

The simplicity that comes from our natural commonsense decisions is apt to be mistaken for the witness of the Spirit, but the Spirit witnesses only to His own nature and to the work of Redemption, never to our reason.  If we try to make Him witness to our reason, it is no wonder we are in darkness and perplexity.  Fling it all overboard, trust in God, and He will give the witness.

From Oswald Chambers

big_lines

            podcast-25-25

The Sin that Makes God Cry

The Sin that Makes God Cry

Let me give it to you straight— no beating around the bush and no soft-pedaling.  The sin that makes God cry is being committed daily, not by pagan workers of iniquity but by multitudes of Christians— the sin of doubting God’s love for His children.

Do you think it makes God sound too human and vulnerable to say that He cries?  Then ask yourself how a God of love could not cry when His own people doubt His very nature. Jesus Christ was God in the flesh, and according to the book of John He wept when those closest to Him doubted His love and concern.  That was God incarnate at the tomb of Lazarus, crying over friends who failed to recognize who He was.

Time and time again Christ’s dearest associates on this earth doubted His love for them.  Think of the disciples in a storm-tossed boat that was taking on water.  Jesus was in the stern of the boat, sound asleep.  Fearing for their lives, His followers shook Him awake and then accused Him of outright unconcern.  “Master, carest thou not that we perish?” (Mark 4:38).  How their accusation must have grieved the Lord!  That was God Almighty in their boat! How could He not care?  But whenever men take their eyes off the Lord and concentrate instead on their circumstances, doubt always takes over.  Jesus was astounded!  “How can you be afraid when I am with you?  How can you question My love and care?”

Christians today grieve the Lord in this matter even more.  Our unbelief is a greater affront to Him than the unbelief of Mary, Martha, and all the disciples, for our sin is committed against greater light.  We stand on a higher mountain and see more than they could ever see.  We have a completed Bible with a full and detailed record of God’s trustworthiness.  We have the written testimonies of almost twenty centuries of Christians, generation after generation of godly fathers who have passed down to us unshakable proofs of God’s love.  And we have countless personal experiences that testify to God’s tender love and affection for us.

Let us look for His exceeding mercy and love, admit the sinfulness of our unbelief, and recognize who He is!

By David Wilkerson
(May 19, 1931 – April 27, 2011)

big_lines

            podcast-25-25

The Human Side of the Nativity

The Human Side of the Nativity

Recently I have been pondering the events surrounding the birth of Christ.  The Nativity, as it is known.

But I have not been pondering the stuff we preach about every December.  You know, the supernatural side of that birth, the star in the sky, the annunciation of the angels to the shepherds, or the coming of the magi with gifts of great value.  No, I have been thinking about a man and young woman.  Tired.  Alone.  Rejected.  Seemingly forsaken.  They were frightened as Mary’s labor pains, sharp, deep and increasing in intensity and frequency, signaled that the birth of Messiah was drawing near.  And they were terrified at all that wondrous birth would entail.

Two people.  Two lives.  Two different stories.

The following is a song that, for me, captures the heart of young Mary as she gives birth to her Son, our Lord, Jesus.  It is written by Andrew Peterson and sung by Jill Phillips.  It’s called, “Labor of Love.”

Listen and reflect on that night, from the heart of Mary.

big_lines

maryIt was not a silent night
There was blood on the ground
You could hear a woman cry
In the alleyway that night
On the streets of David’s town

And the stable was not clean
And the cobblestones were cold
And little Mary full of grace
With the tears upon her face
Had no mother’s hand to hold

It was a labor of pain
It was a cold sky above
But for the girl on the ground in the dark
Every beat of her beautiful heart
Was a labor of love

Noble Joseph by her side
Calloused hands and weary eyes
There were no midwives to be found
On the streets of David’s town
In the middle of the night

So he held her and he prayed
Shafts of moonlight on his face
But the baby in her womb
He was the maker of the moon
He was the Author of the faith
That could make the mountains move

It was a labor of pain
It was a cold sky above
But for the girl on the ground in the dark
Every beat of her beautiful heart
It was a labor of love
Little Mary full of grace
With the tears upon her face
It was a labor of love

big_lines

And then we have the story told from Joseph’s side. This moving song is from Sawyer Brown titled, “It Wasn’t His Child” from their 19th album, True Believer. Listen to the Nativity as told by Joseph.

big_lines

josephHe was her man, she was his wife
And late one winter night
He knelt by her
As she gave birth
But it wasn’t his child
It wasn’t his child

Yet still he took him as his own
And as he watched him grow
It brought him joy
He loved that boy
But it wasn’t his child
It wasn’t his child

But like a father he was strong and kind and good
And I believe he did his best
It wasn’t easy for him but he did all he could
His son was different from the rest
It wasn’t his child
It wasn’t his child

And when the boy became a man
He took his father’s hand
And soon the world
Would all know why
It wasn’t his child
It wasn’t his child

But like a father he was strong and kind and good
And I believe he did his best
It wasn’t easy for him but he did all he could
He grew up with his hands in wood
And he died with his hands in wood
He was God’s child
He was God’s child

He was her man
She was his wife
And late one winter night
He knelt by her
As she gave birth
But it wasn’t his child
He was God’s child

big_lines

big_lines

            podcast-25-25>